Archive for category social media ideas

Student Bloggers 2014 – Here we go again!

Some of my followers on twitter might have noticed that I’ve been a little noisier recently.  Not only am I tweeting more often, I am tweeting about a wider variety of topics.  It is only recently that I have begun to tweet about chocolate or Olympic sports or leg lengthening surgery.  Those who have followed me for a while might have been expecting this-it’s February and that means it’s student blogging time.  Below is a list of student bloggers and their topics.  We are all hoping that people from beyond our classroom will engage us in public discourse.  Just by selecting 1 or 2 students, you can enrich the experience for all of them.  There are 3 ways you can help:

1) Follow a student below on twitter and engage them there.  Answer their questions, point them to resources, challenge their thinking, suggest others to follow that share their interest.  Show them the power of twitter beyond retweeting a request “to show the power of twitter” or “how far a tweet can go”

2) Read their blogs and leave a comment.  Answer their questions, challenge their thinking or assumptions, encourage or suggest further reading sources.

3) The easiest way to help is to retweet their tweets that I share.  You can at least do that…generate a little noise to help a student reach a larger or more receptive audience than I can.

Join in a discussion- teach and learn- the noise will only last a little while…ride it out.

Blog topics and URLS:

1) Child Beauty Pageants:

Twittter: @Childpagents

WordPress: http://childspagent.wordpress.com/

-or-

Twitter: @ChildsPageant

blog:http://childspageant.wordpress.com/

2) Exploring the future

Twitter: @future898

Blog Website:  http://future898.wordpress.com

3) poverty and “I am a Girl”

Twitter: @povertism

WordPress Blog:  povertism.wordpress.com

4) The effects of video games

twitter: @effectsofgames

blog: callumkgames.wordpress.com

– or –

5) Twitter: @TVGEffects

Blog: VGEffect.wordpress.com

6) Vimy Ridge

Twitter: @Vimy_Ridge_WW1

Blog: http://Cdeyman.wordpress.com/

7) The history of video games

Twitter: @Gamings_History

Blog:  http://gaminghashistory.wordpress.com/

8) The Twinkie

Twitter: @TwinkieEx

Blog:  Twinkiescientest.wordpress.com

9) Space exploration

Twitter: @PaolucciInSpace

Blog paolucciinspace.wordpress.com

10) Aliens in media

Twitter: @InAliens

Blog: http://interestedinaliens.wordpress.com

11) Child Soldiers

Twitter: @war_children

Blog: http://warchildren1.wordpress.com/

12) prejudice and acceptance

Twitter: @endtheprejudice

Blog: http://endtheprejudice.wordpress.com

13) Factory Farming

Twitter: @savefarmanimal

WordPress: savefarmanimal.wordpress.com

14) Air Canada

twitter: @triboykyle

Blog:: triboykyle@wordpress.com

15) Animal Testing

twitter: @animaltesting00

Blog:: animaltesting02.wordpress.com

16) Olympic sports

Twitter: @OlympicIdeal5

Blog: http://uspersons.wordpress.com/wp-admin/

17) Animal Intellegence / rights

Twitter: @studentssps22

Blog: http://studentssps.WordPress.com

18) the Rwandan genocide

Twitter: @rwandagenocide_

Blog: jesserwandagenocide.wordpress.com

19) Chocolate

Twitter: @chocolate_ISU

Blog: chocolateisu.wordpress.com

20) Nuclear Power

Twitter: @cw_nuclear

Blog: http://cwnuclearpower.wordpress.com

21) Pain

Twitter: @poison_pain

Blog: pain233.wordpress.com

22) Plastics and the Pacific Garbage Patch

twitter: @juliplastica

blog: http://www.juliplastica.wordpress.com.

23) Leg lengthing surgery

twitter: @XternalFixator

24) historic and current slave trades

Twitter: @SlaveTrade1700s

Blog: Slavetrade1700s.wordpress.com

25) The Beauty Myth

Twitter: @cons_of_beauty

Blog: http://thebeautymythblog.wordpress.com/

26) sports

twitter: @sportguy133

blog: https://juliandrifterdude.wordpress.com/wp-admin/

27) human evolution

Twitter: @sotweetedrhiley

Blog: sobloggedrhiley.wordpress.com

28) should kids have homework

Twitter: @HomeworkYesErNo

Blog:

Hopefully, you’ll find one or two that appeal to you and help make their experience more enriching.

Thanks

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Student Twitter accounts and Blog addresses 2013

Here is the Blog and Twitter roll for this year.  I will be updating it as my students finish creating their blogs (They should all be done by Feb. 19th).

Most of my students chose to use Twitter and blogging as part of their independent study unit.  These are my student’s Twitter accounts dedicated to their independent study topics.  They would appreciate a follow and a visit to their blogs (Some aren’t quite ready for visitors yet….).  Their handles indicate their topic; hopefully 1 or 2 of the topics interest you.  This is a good opportunity to demonstrate the value of twitter, instead of just re-tweeting requests to “see how far a tweet can go…”

Accounts:

This one is mine: Twitter: @ginrob_pt  Blog: tuckerteacher@wordpress.com

@end_pit_ban

@resource14

@Qbseparation   Blog: quebecisu.wordpress.com

@jexboi  Blog: Goodandbadofsocialnetworking.blogger.com

@childpageants  Blog: childpageants.wordpress.com

@KailynESP

@Michaelalogo  Blog:  mouseyhorse 

@Assisted5uicide    Blog: lalalittle45.wordpress.com

@canadianhealth0   Blog:http://impovinghealthcareincanada.wordpress.com

@Icensorship   Blog: http://internetcensorship89.wordpress.com

@populationcont3

@ Hey_Quarrymen   blog:  heyquarrymen64.blogspot.ca 

 

@H_Euthanasia   Blog: spoonwither.wordpress.com

@ ethanhoover@hotmail.ca

@cyberbullying12  

@TheNHLnation  Blog:http://thehistoryofhockey.wordpress.com/2013/02/22/hockey-blogg/

@ realMEDIAtoday 

@GlobalWarmingeE Blog: GlobalWarmingFactsE.blogspot.com

@MusicComparison   http://musiccomparison.wordpress.com/

@howthedinosdied  Blog: http://howthedinosaursdied.blogspot.ca/

@bunny_books  Blog: http://bannedbooks123.wordpress.com 

@pmabdixon  blog:http:http://wordpress.com/

@Child_LabourPS     Blog- childlabourisu1.wordpress.com

@GoodeHeighly   Blog- Heidi12315.wordpress.com

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Warning: Here we go again:

Well folks, it’s that time of year again.  My students are starting their twitter accounts and will soon be blogging about their ISU topics.  I’m hoping more of my followers on Twitter will follow them this year.  Last year, more followers unfollowed me than chose to followed my students.  Granted, one might argue that I was producing a lot of noise by forwarding so many of their tweets and links to their posts; however, I was still surprised.

Most of my followers are educators and have proclaimed interests in student digital learning.  I rarely retweet about “the 5 things you need to do for digital learning” or “how to improve student writing through blogging,” or the like.  Instead, once a year, I provide an example of how my students are doing actually doing it; example rather then theory.

So this is a warning, I’m going to get noisy really soon.  I will be tweeting about them and to them quite a bit in about a week.

  • Unfollow me if you wish,
  • ignore me if you can,
  • or show how committed you are to student learning and help show the value of networks and digital media by following 1 or 2 of my students and responding to them from time to time.

Last year, @HeidiSiwak and @mbcampbell360 did an amazing job and really helped turn a school assignment into an authentic experience.  I’m hoping others will join in more actively as well.

There’s a lot of theory out there and a lot of technophiles who talk about “cognitive surplus” and the value of voluntary networks.  I didn’t really see too much last year—as I said, I was surprised.

In a week I will begin posting on twitter my student accounts and blog addresses; I will also post them here.  Please follow 1 or 2 and perhaps respond from time-to-time

Thanks

Patrick

 

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Don’t teach with tech until you know what you’re doing (did I really just say that?)

 I was talking to @mbcampbell360 on twitter the other day…oops…did you catch it? I of course wasn’t talking; I was using Twitter, the micro-blogging publishing and broadcasting service, …but I digress…. I was reminiscing about an old friend who liked to learn as he went. He’d not really plan and think things out—for him, the first idea was always the best and it was “go time” – time to explore. Often this led him into trouble…I remember the 40 ft ladder falling off the building into the parking lot, I remember the 100 year old tree falling the wrong way and almost crushing most of my cottage guests (don’t worry, it only rushed the outhouse-vacant!). I think this “don’t worry-it will all work out-you don’t need to have deep understanding of what you are doing or the consequences of such” is a very worrying trend in education right now…

I am getting a little concerned by the level of ignorance we tolerate, even encourage, in teachers using digital technology and SM with their students.  Often educators insist that the tech shouldn’t be “the lesson”, but a tool–its not about the tech!  I agree with their reasons, but it does also allow teachers to have a cavalier attitude to tech instruction.  I believe there is a vast amount of instruction to be done regarding the tech. before it is opened to be used by students as a tool (you can see the process I went through before students were encouraged to blog and tweet here: https://tuckerteacher.wordpress.com/2012/01/21/the-process-we-went-through-to-start-blogging/ -its not tech specific; studetns can still explore).  This requires the teacher to learn it first. 

I’d like to highlight 2 tweets that were sent recently (without identifying the person—while these were sent by individuals, I feel that they represent common trends in education):

“hey PLN…I need help. I’ve borrowed 10 iP@ds for two months to use with my class. What are must-have apps?” This concerns me a bit. While it may be the case that she already has well thought out reasons and uses already planned for these iPads (well not certain, but hoping), I guess my fear is that she doesn’t. That she is going to do some exploring with her kids and see what they can do. That she’s going to teach them the technology (or let them explore and learn undirected) rather then a learning goal. For her and her class, I worry, that it will be about the technology and it will be directionless and without other learning goals. It will be dangerous.

another tweet was:

“introduced the Ipads to my kids yesterday and was AMAZED (sic) with what they came up with!” While it is sometimes the case that our students surprise us, and there can be no happier occasion then when students exceed our expectations; nonetheless, I can’t help but fear that this teacher really had no idea what she was doing with the iPads to further their learning. If they outstrip your expectations in the introduction, the process you went through to develop your expectations was flawed. It could be she’s only talking about how surprised she was at their speed of ‘mastery’ but the fear lingers in me regardless.

I’ve written about this metaphor before, but I’d like to explore it more fully. Teaching SM to students should be done like driving instructors. We should be experts first, our exploring days should be behind us, and we should advise caution (you can see the original here: https://tuckerteacher.wordpress.com/2011/09/27/learning-to-use-social-media-shouldnt-be-like-learning-to-ride-a-bicycle-it-should-be-like-learning-to-drive-a-car/ ).

Experts first:

We used to talk about deep understanding and master teachers. Of course now we talk about innovators and experimenters and willingness to fail. While these are desirable traits at times, I’m not sure that using SM with students is one of them. Assuming for the moment that SM is a powerful learning tool, shouldn’t that power have a little direction. If it is a powerful opportunity, it is all the more tragic when it is squandered and wasted. If anyone feels there is no wrong way to use it; that it is so intuitive you don’t need deep understanding, or it is so powerful that in can overcome the instructor’s ignorance, then let them come forward and argue it below; otherwise, me must posit that increasing our knowledge increases the power of the tool. It was the master teacher who know many teaching techniques (TDSB and YRDSB—remember Instructional intelligence?) and had the deep understanding to know when and how to apply them to extend and maximize student learning. Sure kids can learn on their own, sure they can learn in spite of our ignorance- but wouldn’t a knowledgeable instructor help? Can we afford inefficient models of teaching? Are we being professional if we utilize them? The answer used to be a resounding and emphatic no. What changed? What role do we play better wrapped in ignorance like scholarly garb?

Out exploring days should be behind us:

We should be masters in technology and SM firs; before we introduce it to our students. What other subject would we tolerate such teacher ignorance? As students progress in school, should they be more tolerant of it or less? Should primary teachers not understand young kids or not be masters of reading and teaching techniques? Is there any other place that we praise teachers for not knowing and for learning concurrently with their students so completely? It really bothers me to hear teachers talk about using SM to have a conversation—they aren’t conversations. They are broadcast and publishing mediums permanently attached to your identity. They are advertisement delivery services-neither free or safe (without understanding). I have said several times: read some Neil Postman, and some Danah Boyd. If you are going to bring minors into this environment, you had better understand it. Would you bring them into any other environment that you weren’t knowledgeable in? The forest? The subway? A desert? On a Frozen pond? How can we prepare, utilize, trouble shoot, assist, protect, and guide effectively when we don’t have deep understanding of what’s happening?

Advise caution:

look before you leap! Check your mirrors! Look both ways! Don’t talk to strangers! In unknown or alterable situations, we advise caution. Why wouldn’t we be cautious with SM and digital technology? Imagine our driving instructor saying such things as, “I don’t know, lets find out!”, “lets see what this can do!” , “feel free to explore a bit!”, “don’t be afraid to make mistakes”, “the highways work by everyone being nice to each other, don’t worry, people will help you!” Hmmm…Of course, you have to be knowledgeable to realize there are dangers on the Net and such. This is especially true because of all the bad advice about how safe and wonderful it is. Of course it is these things, but just like a car, it is only true when the conditions are right and you know what you are doing.

Some one else tweeted: “When introduced to a new technology, I’ve never heard a student say, “when’s the workshop?’” I hope that when you teach it to them, you do it with such rigor that they would never need to say that. I hope that when intorduced to tech, you did it with in the frame work of a workshop—why wouldn’t you? If you leave them not understanding, you have failed them and left them at risk. Don’t use Tech. Until you know how to use Tech. Don’t teach tech. until you know how to teach it and use it to teach.

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The process we went through to start blogging

 So the class of 2012’s blogs and Twitter accounts are off and running. I want to take a moment to detail the process I’ve gone through before and with them to get to this point. I think its going to be a long one so I’m just going to write a step-by-step list with little rhetorical flourish.

Edit: I have left it vague; a rough sketch—if you want more detail about a specific step, just let me know…

Prologue:

  1. I was part of a committee that was looking at ways to improve gifted education in YRDSB a couple of years ago. Among other things, we explored the integration of technology and social media (shockingly:). I was pushed a little and encouraged to use Twitter with my class as part of the process. I was resistant, but I capitulated. I should not have; I was not ready. I was unprepared, and I don’t think that it was useful or even safe for my students. I continued to learn (by myself) because something in it appealed to me. It was a useful learning experience to me

  2. I became certain, and continue to maintain, that a teacher should not explore technology or any technique/content with students. You should explore it first yourself. If you are going to open a door to students, you had better know how, and you had better know what’s on the other side first. I have blogged this sentiment several times on this site.

  3. I learned more: I read articles from Techcrunch, GigaOm (specifically @mathewi). I read some Clay Shirky (“Here comes everybody”, “Cognitive Surplus”), I re-read Marshall McLuhan, Neil Postman. I read some Danah Boyd.

  4. I continued to use Twitter and other social media on my own. I started my own blog and made my own mistakes

  5. I had many conversations with my principal and vice-principal as well as board consultants. I developed my own robust permission/consent form/appropriate use of technology

2 years and some experimenting later, I was willing to try it again….the following are steps my class and I went through this year to get ready for January and February’s Journalism/Web 2.0/SM unit/ Public Discourse:

Part 1 – Exploring Media:

  1. we define media and explored some McLuhan and Postman. We explore a broad definition of what is media. We learn about how different media influence messages and have their own limitations. We learn about “hot” and “cold” media and the effect the receiver has on the message (but also how the media effects it as well).

  2. We explored Neil Postman’s “5 ideas we need to know about technological change.”

  3. We use it as a analytical framework for media using tools like: https://tuckerteacher.wordpress.com/2011/04/21/analytic-tool-based-on-postmans-5-ideas/

  4. We explore brand creation and its relationship to people’s self fashioning as we explored advertising. I would have liked to spend more time on ad techniques and audience interaction (next time).

  5. They work on a series of “Media Koan’s” to get them looking at media differently and critically (you can see some of them here: https://tuckerteacher.wordpress.com/2011/05/06/media-koans/)

Part 2 –The Moodle Years:

  1. Our class uses our moodle course quite extensively. From the first week they are building a community of learners and are using digital tools to help each other and extend their learning beyond the classroom. There are many wiki’s, forums, topics, and discussions.

  2. They are introduced to Tucker’s rules for using social media https://tuckerteacher.wordpress.com/2011/04/06/tuckers-rules-for-using-social-media/

  3. They practice the skills of digital citizenship before they are formally introduced to the topic (at least from me). Before the “blogging unit” the average student has posted well over 100 times on our course.

Part 3- The ISU

  1. As part of the gifted program at our school, students participate in an independent study unit loosely based on Bloom’s Taxonomy (not that I’m the biggest fan, but it serves-with a few changes)

    1. Students select a topic that has a controversial element and begin researching and learning at school and at home. We teach a parallel curriculum of research skills and note taking that I would like to make more robust next year.

    2. Students demonstrate understanding of their topic in a interview

    3. Analysis (we think it should be 3rd before application-even if this violates Bloom’s). This year we skipped this because of time but it involves laying out, in an organization web, all the facts relevant to a topic (well within reason)

  2. students brush up over the winter holidays and first week back in Januray to hopefully have a good grasp of their topic before the blogging starts

Part 4.. “Corporations are people,” and “The news about the news”

Since there is so much talk about “free” services out there, I try to break down that barrier so they can see these business for what they are-businesses

  1. We talk about the driving ethics of business- for profit, branding and niche marketing. We look at Unilever and its strategies for the Dove and Axe brands.

  2. We look at types of news and the purpose of news from different stakeholder’s perspectives.

  3. We analysis the problem of corporate media control and SM as a possible counter force.

Part 5 – What is the internet really like?

Running parallel to parts 2-5 above, we start our social media/journalism/web 2.0/public discourse unit (some of the below items run concurrently)…

  1. We pre-teach vocabulary and concepts

  2. We discuss business models of “free” services like Zynga

  3. We discuss in detail issues of privacy. (for example: http://www.danah.org/papers/talks/2011/PDF2011.html (“networked privacy”) , http://www.guardian.co.uk/tedx/cory-doctorow-privacy?CMP=twt_gu , http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/technology/digital-culture/trending-tech/free-sucks-i-want-my-privacy-back/article2128006/ , I discuss elements of: Why Privacy matters even if you have nothing to hide: http://chronicle.com/article/Why-Privacy-Matters-Even-if/127461/?sid=cr&utm_source=cr&utm_medium=enBy by Daniel J. Solove, with them as well

  4. We explore the concepts digital footprint and digital citizenship. We host discussions on our moodle and bring in an array of sources.

  5. We discuss related internet issues that the students find and bring back to a moodle hosted discussions

  6. We discuss the effects of networks and being part of a community (and the production of hyper-local news

  7. We talk about the “Who owns the digital you” series by Tim Chambers

  8. We talk about how Twitter and SM are publishing and broadcasting networks and how they are different from a conversation. We learn about the implications of Danah Boyd’s work: 4 ideas of the internet persistent, replicable, searchable, scalable (“Social Network Sites as Networked Publics: Affordances, Dynamics, and Implications.” In Networked Self: Identity, Community, and Culture on Social Network Sites (ed. Zizi Papacharissi); the dangers of the invisible audience; and http://m.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2011/08/why-facebook-and-googles-concept-of-real-names-is-revolutionary/243171/

  9. We have discussions about some of the following (dependend on time or where we menader arround:

    1. real name policies: http://geekfeminism.wikia.com/wiki/Who_is_harmed_by_a_%22Real_Names%22_policy%3F , http://gigaom.com/2011/10/18/for-twitter-free-speech-is-what-matters-not-real-names/ , http://gigaom.com/2011/06/20/anonymity-has-real-value-both-in-comments-and-elsewhere/ , “Real Names” Policies Are an Abuse of Power http://www.zephoria.org/thoughts/archives/2011/08/04/real-names.html , http://m.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2011/08/why-facebook-and-googles-concept-of-real-names-is-revolutionary/243171/ (again) , and http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/07/27/randi-zuckerberg-anonymity-online_n_910892.html

    2. other issues as discovered by their earlier serachs and conversations

  1. Other safety

    1. http://canadasafetycouncil.org/child-safety/online-safety-rules-kids (especially the 3rd in the list)

    2. And corollary issues like: http://socialmediacollective.org/2011/08/11/if-you-dont-like-it-dont-use-it-its-that-simple-orly/

Part 6 –Their turn?

  1. I introduce them to the complexities of Twitter and some of the issues: reinforce the 4 Danah boyd principles and the invisible audience, Spambots, etiquette, offensive content, and how to use twitter well. We gather and look at sources for twitter and blogging. We talk about the different uses of twitter and the like. We primarily use twitter to build an audience and advertise blog posts to drive traffic to our discussions

  2. Students decide which strategy they want to use for entering public discourse from here: https://tuckerteacher.wordpress.com/2011/05/07/7-archetypes-for-entering-public-disources-through-social-media/ They are also free to make their own moodle course and mimic the process if they feel they are not ready (given the time spend on caution, I don’t feel I can make it mandatory…this year 2 students chose this option…we made them teachers of their own moodle course and they use that as a website to host their classmates or others they invite into discussions on their topic).

  3. Students make their first 10 tweets, and I review them carefully. We discuss clarity, long term consequences, digital citizenship issues. Once their first 10 are vetted, they are approved to tweet at will!

  4. Finally, the part that the public sees: Students begin to build their own posts or comment on the posts of others depending on their chosen strategy, tweet to drive traffic to their posts, build audiences, engage in discussions, and learn….

Part 7 – Their learning log:

  1. Students record their activities and their thoughts about them on their learning log (hosted on the class moodle) which I monitor, continuously assess, and eventually evaluate

That is the sketch…I feel I’ve left a lot out….might have to update. But in the meantime please consider following one of my student accounts and commenting on their posts. They can be found here: https://tuckerteacher.wordpress.com/2012/01/18/student-twitter-account-roll/

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Our bid for Best Buy’s “The Best in Class Fund”

Best Buy has a program of offering grants to schools to be used on digital technology.  Our school went through the process and was awarded $20,000. Many thanks to Stephen Hurley and others for starting and encouraging the thinking and exploration that led us to this point.  We still have other areas we are continuing to focus on based on this article: http://www.designshare.com/index.php/articles/great-learning-street-debate and two posts by Stephen Hurley that I continue to lose the links for.  Hopefully, he (or someone else) will respond below and post the links to his blog posts on “imagination rooms” and “invigorating the front entrance to a school.” Both posts I believe are on hosted on the CEA’s website.   Here is the text from our successful bid.  

Best Buy Essay Contest

Question 1: How do you plan to use the technology with your students to inspire and enhance their education? Please be as detailed as possible (500 words).

We plan to use the technology to enhance our students learning experience at Glen shields in four areas:

1) We plan to invigorate our front lobby as a communal learning and sharing space that promotes student learning and community/parental engagement. Our plan is to create a space that can be used by students, teachers and parents to meet communally to interact and work on their own projects. We envision a space that encourages collaboration and welcomes a school’s diverse set of stakeholders to met and share in learning. We require computers, technology to support video conferencing and video editing, and a television to broadcast announcements for this space.

2) We wish to create an imagination room in a section of our library resource centre. This would offer a student center where they would be free to pursue self-directed and collaborative learning activities with a focus on critical thinking and inquiry through a lens of creativity and innovative exploration. We require computers, tablets and an LCD projector, technology to support video conferencing and video editing, Livescribe pens (allows you to digitally record everything you write and say) and other experiential learning kits (like circuit boards, robotics, etc.) available in this space.

3) We are interested in filling some of our public spaces around the school with social learning centers. Similar to the imagination room, these would be hubs of self-directed social learning and inquiry. We want to include computers and other technology resources dedicated to supporting an interactive and inquiry based learning experience.

4) We’d like to augment the technology already available as part of the classroom program. We require additional LCD projectors, computers to increase the size of our portable laptop/netbook labs, etc.

Together, technology in these 4 areas would allow us to offer diverse learning experiences to our students that would otherwise be impossible. Given the limitations of our current resources, technology has primarily been dedicated to classroom use and the instruction of students. We would like to dedicate this new investment in technology to further promote student learning and experimentation. This would allow us to offer the following experiences more efficiently and effectively to our students: virtual field trips to increase their understanding of the world in which they live, skyped connections to others – to have our students not just learn about others but to learn from others in an innovative and interactive way; work with all stakeholders (parents and students) to create videos to facilitate flipped classrooms; access a school Moodle course to foster an internal learning community and access points to develop learning communities outside the school through the integrated use of social media.

We feel that such opportunities will raise the level of engagement of some of our students experiencing learning challenges and provide valuable outlets for our more independent and creative learners. Independent access to learning tools and social learning contexts will provide a voice in our school community to groups that have been traditionally silenced or lacked voice as they access the rich environment offered by social media through digital technology.

Question 2: Tell us more about the students that would be directly impacted and how they would benefit from the grant. (250 words)

Our school is a microcosm ofCanada. Our school is an incredibly diverse school; this offers the same advantages and challenges of Canada as a whole. We service a community that includes a high number of recent immigrants and ELL learners, a diverse array of socio-economic realities, a large visible minority community, and gifted learners. Many students in this school have only limited access to digital technology, the Internet, social media and independent self-guided learning. Digital technology will help us service the diverse needs of this group. It will allow us to provide both a common experience of base instruction and learning, and it will allow us to focus on each student’s specific needs and interests.

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Student Twitter Account Roll

Most of my students chose to use Twitter and blogging as part of their independent study unit.  These are my student’s Twitter accounts dedicated to their independent study topics.  They would appreciate a follow and a visit to their blogs (Some aren’t quite ready for visitors yet….).  Their handles indicate their topic; hopefully 1 or 2 of the topics interest you.  This is a good opportunity to demonstrate the value of twitter, instead of just re-tweeting requests to “see how far a tweet can go…”

Accounts:

@OilEthicist

@dystopia_soma Blog: http://dystopiadissected.blogspot.com/

@gmfoodopinions Blog: gmfoodconcerns.blogspot.com

@Shalit_deal Blog: http://shalitdeal.blogspot.com/

@em_radiation Blog: www.effectsofemr.blogspot.com

@saudirights_rz Blog:http://saudiarabianwomensrights.blogspot.com/

@FactoryFarms1 Blog: http://factoryfarms-thetruth.blogspot.com/

@NuclearinCanada Blog: http://nuclearpowerincanada.wordpress.com

@bestr8againsth8 Blog: http://gayfollowraystraightagainsthate.tumblr.com/

@cloning2 Blog: http://cloning2012.blogspot.com/

@pitbullbanning Blog: http://shouldpitbullsbebanned.blogspot.com/ 

@ChildCare458 Blog: http://careforchildrennow.wordpress.com

@D_Euthanasia Blog: www.euthanasiaincanada.wordpress.com

@Recycle_Smart Blog: http://recyclingethically.wordpress.com/

@aff_action2 Blog:

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