Strategy Games for procedural writing

Strategy Games for procedural writing

People have been sharing, on Twitter, about learning with games for a while now, and I wanted to share these games.  These are strategic board games that are easy to duplicate and only require markers to play.  I photocopied and laminated game boards and used counting squares as markers.  I started using them when I taught Junior Special Ed. but I have also used these games with every level from grade 4 to grade 8 gifted.  Originally, it was to work with procedural writing. Students read and figure out how to play a game.  Once they are good at it, they either have to explain the rules in their own words, describe a game being played, or create a detailed strategy guide.  Several of them were written at different levels but that was a longer project then into which Iwanted to  invest.  Several of these games have been played for over 1000 years.  There are many other games that would be suitable (ex: the Royal game of Ur).  Here is my selection:

FOX AND GEESE

Fox and Geese seems to have originated in northernEuropesome time during the Viking Age.

  1. The game is a contest between one Fox and 13 Geese.
  2. Play begins with the pieces in the positions shown.
  3. Players may move a piece to any vacant adjacent spot on the board, either vertically, horizontally or diagonally along the marked lines.
  4. Only the Fox may jump another piece.
  5. When a piece is jumped, it is removed from the board.
  6. The object for the Geese is to capture the Fox by surrounding him so he cannot move or jump.
  7. The Fox must try to remove all the Geese, or at least enough of them so that there are not enough left for a capture.

AWITHLAKNANNAI

Player 1

                                                                    

Player 2

  1. Set up the board as shown above.
  2. Randomly determine who goes first.
  3. Players take turns moving one of their pieces at a time either forwards or sideways
  4. Pieces may not move back towards their player.
  5. The object of the game is to jump your opponent’s pieces and make yours safe by moving them across the board to the other side. 
  6. Pieces can be jumped.  To jump, the pieces must line up along a line with an empty space behind the piece being jumped (like in checkers).
  7. When no one can move any of their pieces, the game is over. 
  8. The winner is the person with the most pieces left at the end go the game.

 

FIERGES 

 

RULES (this game is similar to Checkers):

  1. Pieces are set on the first 2 rows in front of each player.  All spots must be occupied.  The middle row will be empty.  The pieces are moved diagonally, forward, or sideways one space at a time. They cannot move backwards.
  2. You may jump over and capture an opponent’s piece if there is an empty space beyond it. If, having jumped and captured a piece, you find your piece is able to jump another of your opponent’s pieces, you may do so. Captured pieces are removed from the board. In Fierges there is no compulsion to capture an opponent’s piece.
  3. If you manage to place a piece on your opponent’s back line, that piece becomes a King. That piece is “crowned” or marked to denote its status. Usually by placing a second captured piece on top of it
  4. A King can move backwards or forwards; however, “crowning” ends a move. So a piece cannot move into the back line, become a king then jump back out over opponent’s piece capturing it, in the same move. It must wait until its next move.
  5. The object of the game is to capture your opponent’s 10 pieces or make it so they can’t move.

 

FOUR FIELD KONO

Number of Players: 2
Equipment: Board and 2 sets of 8 marbles for Four Field Kono, and 16 marbles

Objective: To capture all your opponent’s pieces (or prevent him or her from moving)

  1. The board is set up as in the picture with each player’s marbles placed in the two rows directly in front of him or her.
  2. Players take turns moving.
  3. A player can capture an opponent’s marble by jumping over one of his or her OWN marbles and landing on the opponent’s marble, which is then captured and removed from the board. Capture moves can only be made horizontally or vertically, not diagonally.
  4. Only one piece can be captured in a move.
  5. If not capturing, a piece can be moved one space horizontally or vertically, not diagonally.
  6. A player who cannot make a move or has only one piece left loses.

 

PROPOSED RULES FOR LATRUNCULI

See full size image 

Use an 8 X 12 grid board

  1. Black plays first.
  2. Each player has 12 pawns and 1 king
  3. All pieces are set on the board before play begins as shown.
  4. All pawns may move any number of spaces in the horizontal or vertical direction.
  5. the king can only move 1 space at a time either horizontal or vertical
  6. A single pawn is captured if it is surrounded on two opposite sides by a combination or Kings or pawns; however, a pawn may move between 2 other pawns without being captured.
  7. The outside walls cannot be used to capture pawns.
  8. A piece in the corner can be captured by two playing pieces (either pawns or kings) placed across the corner.
  9. Multiple stones can be captured if surrounded at the same time, by the same move.
  10. The king cannot be captured but can be immobilized by being surrounded on all four sides. 
  11. The king is also considered immobilized if it is blocked by an enemy stone such that it has no place left to move.
  12. First player to immobilize the enemy king wins.
  13. If the game stalemates, the player with the most captured enemy stones wins.
  14. Sequences of plays that repeat endlessly must be prohibited (this is usually obvious to both players after two series of moves repeats — any move initiating a third repeating series of moves is illegal).

 

MERELS

See full size image 

Rules:

  1. Start with an empty board.
  2. Each player has 9 pieces of a different colour.
  3. The players must decide who starts first.
  4. They take turns placing their pieces on the board.  Pieces are put on the board one at a time with the players taking turns.  Only 1 piece can be in any space.
  5. Once all the pieces are put on the board, players can move 1 piece at a time along the lines to the next empty space.  You cannot move to a space that already has a piece on it.
  6. The object of the game is to form what is called a “mill.”  That is when you have 3 of your pieces in a row.  When you have a mill, you can remove 1 of the other player’s pieces from the board.
  7. One player wins when the other player has only 2 pieces left.
  8. Whenever possible, the captured man should NOT be taken from an opponent’s existing line of three (mill).
  9. Players must move a man if they can.
  10. A player who cannot move a man loses the game.
  11. It IS allowed to move a man out of a mi and then move back the following turn. ll, and then move back the following turn.

 

 

NYOUT 

Nyout is an ancient game, originating in the area currently known asKorea. It is a game that can be played by two, three or four players. Based on horse racing, it’s playing surface is shaped as a circle inscribed with a cross. The circle and the cross are composed of circles that act as playing spaces. The center circle and the circles at the cardinal points are larger than the rest of the circles. 

The object of the game is to enter your pieces onto the board, move them around the board and bear them off. The player to bear all of their pieces off first wins.

The entry and exit point is the small circle to the left of the top large circle and is called the Chut. Pieces travel widdershins (counter-clockwise) around the board. 

Two-Player Nyout

If two people are playing, each player gets four playing pieces, called horses. Players determine the order they go in by a throw of the casting sticks (highest throw goes first).

The casting sticks are composed of four sticks, each with a light and a dark side. The sticks are shaken in a player’s hand and then dropped (cast). The number of light sides showing is the number of moves a player must move one of their horses (from 1 to 4). If no light sides are shown (all four sticks show dark sides) a player must move one of their horses 5 spaces.

Horses enter the Chut on any throw value.

Each circle space (including the Chut) counts as a move of one.

A throw of four or five allows another throw.

Finishing a move on a large circle allows a player to change the direction his horse is going, and on the next move take a shortcut using the paths through the center of the circle, if desired. If a horse taking a shortcut through the circle ends up on the opposite side of the circle with movement still to do they, the horse must turn widdershins (counter-clockwise) and finish out its movement. Use of shortcuts is not required.

If a player’s horse finishes a move on a space that already has a rival horse there, the rival horse is considered to be “kicked”, and it is removed from the board and must begin again. If a player has a horse finish a move on a space that has two or more rival horses there, all rival horses are considered to be “kicked”, and all are removed from the board and must begin again. The player who “kicks” another horse or horses off the board gets an additional turn. They receive only one additional turn no matter how many horses were “kicked”.

If a player’s horse finishes a move on a space that already has one of his own horses there, the player may (if desired) pair the two and have them move as one piece from then on. No more than two pieces may be paired together. If a player has a horse finish a move on a space that has two or more of his own horses there, he may pair pieces (if desired) provided they are not already paired.

An exact throw is NOT required to bear a horse off the board. If a horse is borne off, with movement left, the extra movement is lost.

Three-Player Nyout

The rules are the same if three people are playing, except that each player gets three horses apiece instead of four. Players determine the order they go in by a throw of the casting sticks (highest throw goes first).

The casting casting sticks are composed of four sticks, each with a light and a dark side. The sticks are shaken in a player’s hand and then dropped (cast). The number of light sides showing is the number of moves a player must move one of their horses (from 1 to 4). If no light sides are shown (all four sticks show dark sides) a player must move one of their horses 5 spaces.

Horses enter the Chut on any throw value.

Each circle space (including the Chut) counts as a move of one.

A throw of four or five allows another throw.

Finishing a move on a large circle allows a player to change the direction his horse is going, and on the next move take a shortcut using the paths through the center of the circle, if desired. If a horse taking a shortcut through the circle ends up on the opposite side of the circle with movement still to do they, the horse must turn widdershins (counter-clockwise) and finish out its movement. Use of shortcuts is not required.

If a player’s horse finishes a move on a space that already has a rival horse there, the rival horse is considered to be “kicked”, and it is removed from the board and must begin again. If a player has a horse finish a move on a space that has two or more rival horses there, all rival horses are considered to be “kicked”, and all are removed from the board and must begin again. The player who “kicks” another horse or horses off the board gets an additional turn. They receive only one additional turn no matter how many horses were “kicked”.

If a player’s horse finishes a move on a space that already has one of his own horses there, the player may (if desired) pair the two and have them move as one piece from then on. No more than two pieces may be paired together. If a player has a horse finish a move on a space that has two or more of his own horses there, he may pair pieces (if desired) provided they are not already paired.

An exact throw is NOT required to bear a horse off the board. If a horse is borne off, with movement left, the extra movement is lost.

Four-Player Nyout

If four people are playing, there are slightly different rules. First, each player gets two horses instead of four. Players form teams of two players each. Players still determine the order they go in by a throw of the casting sticks (highest throw goes first). Thus a team might go first & second, first & third, first & fourth, second & third, second & fourth or third & fourth.

The casting casting sticks are composed of four sticks, each with a light and a dark side. The sticks are shaken in a player’s hand and then dropped (cast). The number of light sides showing is the number of moves a player must move one of their horses (from 1 to 4). If no light sides are shown (all four sticks show dark sides) a player must move one of their horses 5 spaces.

Horses enter the Chut on any throw value.

Each circle space (including the Chut) counts as a move of one.

A throw of four or five allows another throw.

A PARTNER IN A TEAM MAY MOVE HIS OWN HORSE OR ONE OF HIS TEAMMATE’S HORSES.

Finishing a move on a large circle allows a player to change the direction his horse is going, and on the next move take a shortcut using the paths through the center of the circle, if desired. If a horse taking a shortcut through the circle ends up on the opposite side of the circle with movement still to do they, the horse must turn widdershins (counter-clockwise) and finish out its movement. Use of shortcuts is not required.

If a player’s horse finishes a move on a space that already has a rival horse there, the rival horse is considered to be “kicked”, and it is removed from the board and must begin again. If a player has a horse finish a move on a space that has two or more rival horses there, all rival horses are considered to be “kicked”, and all are removed from the board and must begin again. The player who “kicks” another horse or horses off the board gets an additional turn. They receive only one additional turn no matter how many horses were “kicked”.

Teammate horses do not count as rival horses. Teammate horses may share a space.

If a player’s horse finishes a move on a space that already has one of his own horses there, the player may (if desired) pair the two and have them move as one piece from then on. No more than two pieces may be paired together. If a player has a horse finish a move on a space that has two or more of his own horses there, he may pair pieces (if desired) provided they are not already paired.

A player may NOT pair one of his horses with a teammate’s horse.

An exact throw is NOT required to bear a horse off the board. If a horse is borne off, with movement left, the extra movement is lost.

Quirkat

                                                    

This game is very similar to checkers

  1. At the start of the game, each player places their twelve playing pieces on the board as shown in the diagram.
  2. A piece may be moved from one point to any adjacent point along an empty line, forwards, diagonally or sideways, but not backwards.
  3. If the point is occupied by an opponent’s piece, you may jump over and capture the piece, if there is an empty point beyond it. If, having jumped and captured a piece, you land next to another of your opponent’s that can be jumped, then you may jump again and capture a second piece.
  4. If you can jump, you must, otherwise it is considered to be “huffed”, and can be removed from the board by the other player. If you move a piece instead of one that can jump, the one that could jump is removed by your opponent.  This is not their move.
  5. If two or more pieces can make a capture on the same move, the pieces that did not capture are not removed from the board, if a capture was made. If no capture was made, all pieces that could have captured are considered “huffed” and are removed from the board.
  6. The game ends when one player loses all their pieces, cannot move a piece, or has all their pieces along the back row. In the last case, the player with the most pieces left wins.

Mancala

Rules for Mancala

  1. Mancala is played with seven pits per player.
  2. Your pits are the 6 small pits on your side of the board, and the larger Kalaha pit on the right hand side.
  3. Each player starts the game by placing 4 stones into each of their 6 small pits.
  4. A turn consists of taking all the stones from one of your pits, and then dropping a stone into each following pit in a counter-clockwise fashion
  5. If you drop a stone in your Kalaha, and have stones left, then you continue dropping stones counter-clockwise into your opponent’s pits.
  6. The winner is the person with the most stones in his / her Kalaha
  7. The game ends when all of a player’s pits are empty.
  8. If you end your turn by dropping a stone in your Kalaha, you get to go again
  9. If you end your turn by dropping a stone in one of your pits that is empty, you take the stones in the opposing pit.

 

The Tiger and the Goats (Bagha Chal)

 

 

  1. You begin the game with the Tiger placing his four pieces on the corners of the board.
  2. The Goat then places one piece on the board at any spot where lines cross.
  3. The Tiger then moves one piece along one line to the next intersection. 
  4. The pieces can move along any line in a horizontal, vertical or diagonal direction.
  5. The Tiger and the Goats continue to take turns with the Goat placing pieces and the Tiger moving or jumping until the Goat has placed his or her 20 pieces on the board. 
  6. The tiger’s goal is to eat all the goats.  To do this, he must jump over a goat piece.  A jump can be made when there is an empty space behind the goat like in checkers.  Only one goat can be jumped at a time.  When this happens, the Goat piece is removed from the board.
  7. The Goat pieces cannot move while there are still Goat pieces to be put on the board, so the Goat needs to place the pieces to block a Tiger from eating a Goat.
  8. Once all Goats are on the board, one piece may be moved one space when it is their turn.
  9. The Tiger has won if it eats 5 Goats.
  10. The Goats have won if the Tigers are blocked and cannot move.
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